skywaybridge.com
irreverent
since 1998
   bullshit facebook      follow us on twitter     en español
translate
report bridge news  • what's new  •  by name  • the barrier
feel suicidal? •  search  •  bridge cams  •  prevention
bottom of this page  •  site map  •  home  •  contact us
2020 activity  •  2019  •  2018  •  2017  •  2016  •  2015
2014  •  2013  •  2012  •  2011  •  2010  •  2009
2008  •  2007  •  2006  •  2005  •  2004  •  2003
2002  •  2001  •  2000  •  1999  •  1998  •  1997-1954
 

the skyway jumper barrier

updated: 01.16.20
   after decades of nothing being done and years of "it can't be done!", something is being done. perhaps there will be no more jumpers and we can end this website.
..
01.14.20: widow, crisis center hopeful barrier will prevent skyway bridge jumps
01.14.20, baynews9.com, MANATEE COUNTY, Fla. — Debbie Korell flips through her wedding album, remembering her husband Todd.
"We got married at home right in front of our fire place," she said. "So in order to get from the wedding to the reception, all we had to do was turn in a circle in the living room."
Only pictures are left now. On March 10, 2010 (correction: 03.13.10), Todd got up in the middle of the night, drove to the Sunshine Skyway Bridge, and jumped.
"We had such a fabulous life together. And that’s why I don’t understand why he chose to want to end it," Korell said.
According to our partners at the Tampa Bay Times, nearly 250 (correction: over 300) people have taken their own lives by jumping off the Skyway Bridge.
"Anything and everything that we can do to deter people from jumping from the bridge should be done, and should have been done a long time ago,” Korell said.
And now it is.
The Florida Department of Transportation announced last week plans to move forward with a $3 million project to add suicide prevention netting along the sides of the bridge.
It’s a decision mental health professionals are applauding, saying it will open up an important conversation.
“The more that we can teach our children and our adolescence and our young adults that it is OK to not feel OK, it is OK to ask for help, then I think we will finally get ahead of this suicide epidemic that we have in this country,” said Clara Reynolds, President and CEO of the Crisis Center of Tampa Bay.
As for Korell, she’s thrilled to see action being taken. She believes the netting will deter people from acting before thinking.
"I think a lot of people jump off the bridge because it’s easy. It’s a quick, easy decision,” she said.
Both Debbie and Clara emphasize the most important way to prevent suicide is to erase the stigma that comes with it.
The netting will extend 8 feet above the concrete barriers that are already in place, and will be made of steel.
The project is expected to be completed by this summer.
If you or someone you know is having suicidal thoughts, call the Crisis Center of Tampa Bay at 211 or the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255. (more help)
.
FDOT: I-275 Skyway Bridge Vertical Net, project 445399-1-52-01
fdottampabay.com, The Florida Department has reviewed multiple options to successfully deter suicide attempts on the Sunshine Skyway Bridge while preserving the iconic design.
FDOT previously implemented non-structural deterrence methods including installing six crisis hotline phones to connect with suicide prevention staff, funding 24-hour Florida Highway Patrol coverage, installing cameras to reduce response time, installing signs that message suicide assistance is available and implementing pedestrian and stopped vehicle detectors to reduce response time when motorists park on the bridge.
Technology advancements will allow the necessary inspection equipment to reach over and under the bridge and the Skyway Vertical Net to continue bridge inspections.
The Skyway Vertical Net will be a vertical barrier placed on the outside barrier wall of the bridge. Construction is anticipated to begin in the summer of 2020.
sign up to receive email alerts for this project  •  project factsheet
.
01.09.20: suicide barrier to be installed on the skyway.
01.09.20, tampabay.com, Sunshine Skyway bridge to get suicide prevention barrier
The 8-foot-tall steel netting will run along about a mile and a half of the iconic span that for decades has been a magnet for people seeking to take their own lives.


This rendering from the Florida Department of Transportation shows the eight foot tall steel netting that will be added to the Sunshine Skyway later this year to deter suicidal people from jumping from the iconic span. [Florida Department of Transportation], larger image.

By Tony Marrero
Editor’s note: This story includes descriptions of suicide. If you or someone you know is considering suicide, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or suicidepreventionlifeline.org/chat or call the Crisis Center of Tampa Bay by dialing 2-1-1. (more help)
After his stepson Chris jumped from the Sunshine Skyway bridge a little more than a year ago, Rob Rivard decided to scatter his ashes from the iconic span.
Rivard resolved to wait, however, until the state built some sort of barrier on the bridge to prevent others from taking their own lives there. He contacted state officials and urged them to take action.
“I just felt if I waited, I could tell him, ‘Something positive came out of your death,’” said Rivard, of Tampa.
He could have that closure soon.
After years of pleas for a barrier to deter people from jumping some 200 feet to their deaths in Tampa Bay, the Florida Department of Transportation will construct steel netting along a roughly mile and a half stretch of the Skyway. The netting will extend vertically 8 feet from the top of the bridge’s concrete barriers, making it difficult for anyone to climb over them.
Construction is slated to begin early this summer and will take a few months.
The goal is to remove the Skyway from the ranks of the top four deadliest bridges in America, officials said. Despite measures such as increased law enforcement patrols and more surveillance cameras, the number of suicides each year has continued to trend upward. In 2018, a record 18 people died after jumping from the bridge.
“The top three bridges are either studying it or already doing something, so it was time to do this,” said Jim Jacobsen, district structures maintenance engineer for the Transportation Department. “In spite of our other activities, the numbers were still increasing in the last few years so we started to look at what other bridge owners are doing worldwide.”
Transportation officials searched the globe for design ideas and technology that would offer a minimalist solution to a problem that has vexed the current bridge since it opened in 1987.
One of the most important requirements: The design had to allow access to the truck-mounted booms used to inspect and maintain the underside of the bridge. In recent years, the state has switched to larger trucks, making a vertical barrier more feasible, Jacobsen said.
The barrier must also be light because the bridge’s main segment, which features a 1,200-foot opening between the two towers, won’t hold a lot of additional weight, Jacobsen said.
“For a brick structure, maybe a wrought iron system could work,” he said. “But at the Skyway, the theme is light, airy, linear and thin.”
A plexiglass barrier would be heavy, expensive, add too much wind resistance and eventually deteriorate in the sun.
So officials settled on the stainless steel, diamond-patterned netting used on the Eiffel Tower, the Tappan Zee Bridge in New York and on the deadliest bridge in America for suicides, San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge.
On the Golden Gate, the netting extends horizontally below the bridge. That sort of design on the Skyway would hinder the inspection trucks and extend too far below the bridge into the shipping channel, Jacobsen said.
The Skyway system will feature vertical supports attached to the water side of the bridge’s existing 32-inch high cement barriers. The netting will extend 8 feet from the top of the barriers, creating a nearly 11-foot high obstacle. The netting will extend about 8,000 feet, to a point where the bridge is roughly 50 feet above the water.
The design of the steel netting makes it difficult to climb and easy for wind to flow through, and the color of the steel should blend well with the grays and blues of the water and sky yet still be visible to birds, Jacobsen said. The flexibility that makes it difficult to climb will also make the netting less dangerous to birds that fly into it.
“At the top of the bridge, we don’t see a lot of bird activity like you see on the fishing pier,” he said. “We don’t foresee that as an issue.”
The design has been approved by Florida’s State Historic Preservation Office, which must sign off on any physical modification to the bridge.
“We think when you first drive by it, you’ll see it there,” Jacobsen said. “The next time you drive it, you’ll be looking through it.”
The budgeted cost for the project is $3 million. Construction could start as early as June. A request for bids for the project will go out next week, and the selected contractor has 120 days to complete the project, not including days lost to inclement weather. Construction will not require lane closures because crews will be able to use the 12-foot shoulder.
The Transportation Department is also testing new surveillance camera technology on the bridge that alerts traffic control workers when a vehicle stops on the span and someone gets out. That system will be fully operational later this year.
The Skyway has attracted suicidal people since the 1960s, when previous versions of the bridge spanned Tampa Bay. Records show suicides began to increase when the current bridge, with its cables forming twin triangles visible for miles, opened in 1987.
Since then, at least 248 (correction: over 300) people have died by suicide by jumping from the span and overall activity on the bridge. the number of suicides and saves has generally trended upward, especially in the last decade, Highway Patrol records show. In each of the last four years, the bridge saw an average of one suicide per month. Last year saw a dozen suicides and 15 attempts.
In a Transportation Department study conducted about 20 years ago, a number of concerns were raised about netting, that it would impede the maintenance trucks, might fling jumpers back onto the bridge and into traffic, ensnare trash and wildlife, and mar the bridge’s iconic appearance.
So officials took other measures instead. In 1999, the state installed six crisis hotline call boxes that connect with the Crisis Center of Tampa Bay as soon as someone picks one up. A state trooper patrols the bridge 24 hours a day, seven days a week for a quicker response to potential attempts.
Surveillance cameras have been in place for years, but their numbers have grown and the technology has improved. Last year, the Transportation Department began testing the smart camera system and also added placards with messages of hope along the bridge.
Jacobsen said officials have not yet decided whether the call boxes will remain in place after the barrier is built.
Gary King’s son Jason jumped from the Skyway in 2012. Since then, he has wondered why the state hasn’t built a barrier.
“It’s a complete blessing to hear that the state is finally going to address that," King said. “It will make an enormous difference.”
After his son died, Rob Rivard lobbied a number of elected officials for a barrier including Gov. Ron DeSantis, U.S. Sen. Rick Scott and state Sen. Tom Lee. Rivard was encouraged when transportation officials announced last year that they were studying the issue, and he said he’s “ecstatic" to hear the state is taking action that will save lives and help his family.
“Once that bridge is addressed, I can have peace with it and our family can start moving on and trying to deal with it,” he said. “You’re never going to heal from it."

01.09.20, wtsp.com, Tampa Bay locals and grieving families have been asking for years for authorities to come up with a way to prevent people from jumping off the Sunshine Skyway Bridge.
"I never thought it was actually going to happen. So many people seem to rally against putting up barriers", Tiffany Mills.
She's struggled with mental health issues since the sixth grade and has been fighting for a barrier to stop people from taking their lives on the Sunshine Skyway.
On Thursday, the Florida Department of Transportation announced it will install the Skyway Vertical Net in an effort to deter suicide attempts.
If you or someone you know is struggling or considering suicide, you are not alone. And, there is help available right now.
Contact the Crisis Center of Tampa Bay at 211 or the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at (800) 273-8255. (more)


more: wfla.com: 01.09/01.10fox13newsbaynews9.com
.
05.30.19: FDOT re-examining barriers along Sunshine Skyway Bridge as push from the public grows.
05.30.19, abcactionnews.com, ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Nearly 3,000 people have signed a petition to get a barrier or fence installed on the Sunshine Skyway bridge to save lives.
Robert Irons, who lost his daughter in December, will never look at the Skyway bridge the same again.
“I watched my daughter lose her life there,” said Irons.
Irons went to the bridge on December 23 after getting a call from his daughter. He says he was just feet away from her when she jumped. He’s been in misery for months thinking about how he could have saved her.
“Thousands of ways but I can’t do this alone, it’s gonna take everybody,” he said. “I can’t do it alone, I can’t do it alone.”
He believes a barrier or fence would stop, or at the very least slow someone down and give rescuers the opportunity to save them.
The Florida Department of Transportation installed signs two months ago to encourage people to reach out for help. The messages read, “Yes this world is a better place with you in it,” and “You are alive for a reason — don’t give up.”
But Irons doesn’t think it’s enough.
“How many more lives have to go before that magic number comes?” he asked.
FDOT officials are now re-examining the idea of installing barriers and potentially a netting after previously determining those things could get in the way of inspecting and maintaining the bridge.
They say a physical barrier project is currently being studied and it in the development stage. They said in a statement:
“The Department is very concerned with the suicides occurring on the Sunshine Skyway Bridge. The Department has been monitoring the issue and is currently working on all options to successfully deter suicide attempts on the bridge while securing the necessary approval from the State Historic Preservation Office, which preserves the iconic design of the Sunshine Skyway Bridge.”
In the meantime more than 3,000 people have signed a petition to get barriers. Irons hopes this push becomes a movement.
“I need all the help I can get to save the next person from making this mistake,” he said.
If you, or someone you knows is having suicidal thoughts the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is available 24/7 at 1-800-273-8255. (more help)
.
01.13.19: opinion - Editorial: Revisiting safety on the Sunshine Skyway.
01.13.19, tampabay.com, A record number of suicides last year prompts the state to wisely review security options on the bridge.
The grim statistics speak for themselves: Eighteen people jumped to their deaths from the Sunshine Skyway Bridge last year, a record number that surpassed the previous high of 13 set in 2003 and again in 2017. The rise coincides with a steady increase in the suicide rate across the United States and Florida, and the Florida Department of Transportation deserves credit for revisiting how to deter suicide attempts from the iconic bridge.
The state is acting responsibly by looking to better secure public assets under its control. As the Tampa Bay Times' Tony Marrero reported, DOT had for years rejected calls to install netting or fencing to discourage jumping from the bridge. But this month, a department spokeswoman said officials are studying vertical barriers that could be installed along the bridge walls to deter suicide attempts. In addition, the department is about to install new technology that will detect pedestrians and stopped cars in an effort to alert authorities more quickly to a potential jumper.
The Skyway, which connects Pinellas and Manatee counties, has attracted people intent on taking their lives since the 1960s, (since 11.11.57) when earlier versions of the bridge spanned Tampa Bay. But records show suicides began to accelerate when the current bridge, with its cables forming twin triangles visible for miles, opened in 1987. At its highest point, the bridge deck reaches nearly 200 feet. Since the current bridge opened, 236 people, or an average of about eight people each year, have killed themselves by jumping, Florida Highway Patrol records show, making it one of the deadliest bridges in the country. Overall activity on the bridge — suicides, saves and reports of possible jumpers — has generally trended upward, especially in the last decade.
The DOT has fielded calls for nets or fencing on the Skyway for decades. One department study conducted about 20 years ago cited a number of concerns, suggesting that netting could fling jumpers back onto bridge traffic, impede the use of bridge maintenance equipment and ensnare trash and wildlife. Vertical barriers such as a fence are another option. As recently as last month, the department said it had not found a fencing system that would accommodate the truck–mounted arms that extend under the Skyway to inspect the bridge. But in a new email, spokeswoman Kris Carson said the department is concerned about suicides and is researching new barrier technology.
This is a welcome decision - and one that could save lives. The review could take a year, and in the interim, the department will install devices to detect pedestrians and stopped vehicles, which could speed the response times by authorities to the bridge. Some protective measures are in place already; in 1999, the state installed call boxes that instantly connect with a local crisis center hotline. A state trooper patrols the bridge 24/7, further speeding response times. Officials credit both measures with having saved lives.
Fencing and other technologies may be a precaution of last resort, but they could create those few critical moments that mean the difference between life and death. The DOT deserves credit for addressing a terrible reality on the bridge and a trend line that cries out for the broadest response possible.
.
01.04.19: As record year ends,
Florida studying suicide prevention barriers for Sunshine Skyway bridge.
01.04.19, tampabay.com, by Tony Marrero,
   The Department of Transportation also plans to install new technology to detect people who may be intent on jumping. The toll for 2018 - 18 dead.
The text from Rob Rivard’s stepson came at 5:23 one Sunday morning in November.
A 20-year-old student at Pasco-Hernando State College, Chris Machesney was excited about launching a modeling career. Rivard and his wife hadn’t seen signs that Machesney was unhappy, but when Rivard read the text that morning, he knew it was meant to be a final goodbye.
Rivard frantically called his stepson’s cell phone but never got an answer. He would learn later that a police officer had been alerted to a car parked at the top of the Sunshine Skyway Bridge and pulled up to Machesney’s Toyota Camry at 5:34 a.m.
By then, the young man was already gone. “Within eight minutes of him texting me, he jumped,” Rivard said.
Machesney was one of 18 people to die by suicide from the Skyway last year, a record number that surpassed the previous high mark of 13 set in 2003 and tied in 2017, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. A 19th person who jumped last year survived the fall.
For years, the Florida Department of Transportation has rejected calls to install netting or fencing to deter jumpers from the iconic bridge. But this week, a department spokeswoman said officials are studying vertical barriers that could be installed along the bridge walls to deter suicide attempts.
In addition, the department is about to install new technology that will detect pedestrians and stopped cars to more quickly alert authorities to a potential jumper.
That’s encouraging news for Rivard, who has been lobbying the state to take measures that might have saved his stepson.
“At that moment in their lives, they’ve made a decision,” Rivard said. “You’ve got to make it hard for them so first responders can get there.”
• • •
The Skyway has attracted people set on taking their own lives since the 1960s, when previous versions of the bridge spanned Tampa Bay. Records show suicide there began to accelerate when the current bridge, with its cables forming twin triangles visible for miles, opened in 1987.
At its highest point, the bridge deck soars to nearly 200 feet.
Since the current bridge opened, 236 people, or an average of about eight people each year, have killed themselves by jumping from the Skyway, Highway Patrol records show, making it one of the deadliest bridges in the country.
Overall activity on the bridge — the number of suicides, saves and reports of possible jumpers — has generally trended upward, especially in the last decade. In 2018, at least nine people who appeared to be ready to jump were stopped before they could, records show.
At the nation’s deadliest bridge for suicides, San Francisco’s Golden Gate, workers began installing a stainless steel net last summer. The Florida Department of Transportation has fielded calls for similar nets or fencing on the Skyway for decades.
In a Transportation Department study conducted about 20 years ago, a number of concerns were raised about netting — that it might fling jumpers back onto the bridge and into traffic, ensnare trash and wildlife, impede equipment used to inspect the bridge, and mar the bridge’s iconic appearance.
Another option is some kind of vertical barrier, such as a fence. As recently as last month, the Transportation Department said it had not found a fencing system that would accommodate the truck-mounted extended arms used to reach under the bridge for a complete inspection.
But the department is very concerned about suicides from the bridge and is in the process of researching new barrier technology, spokeswoman Kris Carson said in an email this week.
“The department is re-examining all options to see if any technological advances have occurred including the feasibility of a vertical barrier to be placed on the outside wall,” Carson said.
The research involves structural analysis, an environmental study and coordination with the State Historic Preservation Office. The office must grant its approval to ensure any additional structures are compatible with the bridge’s iconic design. The process could take more than a year, Carson said. (this!)
Meantime, the department will soon put in place “pedestrian and stopped vehicle detectors,” she said, that should reduce response time by authorities when motorists park on the bridge.
Carson did not have additional details Friday.
After his stepson’s death, Rivard contacted the Transportation Department about installing fencing or netting. He then called the office of Gov. Rick Scott and a representative got back to him the next day, saying Scott got his message.
Rivard was soon on a conference call with transportation officials who told him that they were looking into a vertical barrier and that new infrared cameras, monitored around the clock to detect possible jumpers, should be up by this summer.
“I hope they do what they say they’re going to do,” said Rivard, who lives in New Tampa with wife Martiza Machesney, Chris’ mother. “I’m not going away. I’ll be patient now, but I’m not going to be lip-serviced. I just want something done.”
• • •
Some measures in place on the Skyway have saved lives already.
In 1999, the state installed six crisis hotline call boxes that connect with the Crisis Center of Tampa Bay as soon as someone picks one up. A special ring tone in the call center alerts operators that a call is coming from the bridge, said Liza Cruz Cepeda, manager of gateway services at the Crisis Center of Tampa Bay.
The center received a small number of calls last year, but in at least one, an operator was able to prevent the caller from jumping, she said.
A state trooper also patrols the bridge 24 hours a day, seven days a week for a quick response to potential suicide attempts, and troopers have been able to stop people from killing themselves, said Sgt. Steve Gaskins, a spokesman for the Highway Patrol. But Gaskins noted it can take several minutes to respond even if a call comes as soon as someone stops on the bridge.
“If someone really wants to do this, it takes two seconds to stop and jump,” he said. That point was reinforced by the case of a 43-year-old Safety Harbor housekeeper who drove to Skyway Bridge one night last month.
The woman had considered suicide before and had made statements that night that concerned her father, according to a Hillsborough County Medical Examiner’s report. The father followed his daughter to the center span of the Skyway, where she got out of her car and jumped, the report says, apparently before the father had time to try to stop her.
He called 911 and her body was found in the water below.
The rise in suicides from the Skyway corresponds with a steady increase in the suicide rate across the United States and Florida.
According to a report released last summer by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the suicide rate rose by 30 percent between 1999 and 2016, with increases seen across age, gender, race and ethnicity. Florida saw an increase of nearly 11 percent during that period.
The study noted that problems most frequently associated with suicide are life stressors involving work, finances, strained relationships, substance abuse and health issues. Mental health professionals and sociologists have cited the Great Recession, with its widespread layoffs and home foreclosures, as a factor in the increase.
The Tampa Bay Times obtained medical examiner reports for 15 of the 18 people who are confirmed to have died by suicide at the Skway in 2018. They ranged in age from 18 to 67. Thirteen were men. At least half had a history of mental illness, depression, or both, the records show. Nearly all lived in or near the Tampa Bay area.
The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention recommends installing barriers on tall bridges and buildings to discourage jumpers, said Dr. Andreas Pumariega, chief of child and adolescent psychiatry at the University of Florida’s College of Medicine, who has studied suicide.
News that the Transportation Department is installing technology beyond the callboxes is encouraging, Pumariega said.
“You can’t rely on the person changing their mind or making a call,” he said. “You should be looking to catch them in the act in some manner.”
For Rivard, working to see this happen serves as a kind of therapy in the wake of his son’s death.
“This is something you never heal from, you just have to find a way to cope,” he said. “My coping is addressing the problem to start saving other people’s lives.”
If you’re considering suicide or suspect someone you know might be, help is available by calling the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at (800) 273-8255. (more help)
facebook article posts
.
12.10.18: FDOT won’t add netting to prevent suicides on the skyway.
12.10.18, mysuncoast.com/facebook, MANATEE COUNTY, FL (WWSB) - In between the thousand of cars that drive the four mile stretch of the Sunshine Skyway Bridge daily, at least one dozen people have jumped from the top in 2018.
20-year-old Chris Machesney of Tampa died on November 18 around 5:30 a.m. as a result of jumping from the bridge. His father, Robert Rivards, is demanding answers and change.
“You hear about the Skyway Bridge, but until it actually affects you, you don’t really start looking into things,” said Rivards.
Following the suicide, ABC7 reached out to the Florida Department of Transportation, which operates the Sunshine Skyway Bridge. A spokesperson said engineers considered adding netting or fencing in the 1990′s, but were left with too many question marks. A fence would prevent officials from using the proper equipment to inspect the bridge. There would be issues with aerodynamics because of wind and height. Birds could get trapped and the netting could push a jumper back into traffic during a failed attempt.
Despite the limitations, FDOT said a Florida Highway Patrol trooper is always monitoring the bridge, hoping to deter people from jumping. There’s cameras on both sides of the bridge and six phones which connect to the Crisis Center of Tampa Bay. When a person picks up that phone, the Crisis Center automatically deploys a FHP trooper. Unfortunately, according to the crisis center, only a handful of people pick up those phones annually.
“Between those two efforts, we can save somebody if they grab that phone,” said Clara Reynolds, CEO and President of the Crisis Center of Tampa Bay.
If you are in distress with suicidal thoughts, call the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-8255. (3 videos with article.)

12.11.18, wtsp.com, Why hasn't FDOT added netting to prevent suicides on the Sunshine Skyway Bridge? Precautions are being taken on the Sunshine Skyway Bridge, but advocates for netting want to see more done.
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- There's another push to add netting to the Sunshine Skyway Bridge to prevent people from jumping off.
At least a dozen a dozen people have jumped from the top so far this year.
One of them was Chris Machesney.
The 20-year-old Tampa man died in the early morning on Nov. 18. Now, his father tells our news partners at WWSB he wants changes made.

10News has been following similar stories for years.

In 2017, with construction underway on safety nets under the Golden Gate Bridge, 10News Reporter Liz Crawford asked the Florida Department of Transportation if the Sunshine Skyway Bridge could install similar safety measures to stop suicides.

Previous: Suicide and the dark side of the Sunshine Skyway Bridge.

At the time, the department told us it had looked at a fencing system but didn't find one that would work while also allowing bridge inspections to continue as needed.
"It’s important to note the Golden Gate Bridge has a different deck structure than the Sunshine Skyway Bridge," FDOT told 10News. "The Golden Gate Bridge can be inspected by workers below the roadway surface, since the surface is supported by an open steel deck truss. The Sunshine Skyway Bridge is a closed segmental box, and relies on inspection trucks with arms that reach out and under the bridge for a complete inspection. If a fence were to be installed, it could potentially block access for bridge inspection."
Recently, our news partners at WWSB followed up with FDOT and got three more pieces of the puzzle.
FDOT told the news station that in addition to the inspection issues, a fence would create aerodynamics problems due to wind and height, birds might become trapped in the net, and the netting might actually push a jumper back into traffic during a failed attempt.
However, precautions are being taken.
A Florida Highway Patrol trooper is constantly assigned to monitor the bridge to try to prevent jumping. Plus, there are cameras and a handful of public phones that connect people in need to operators with the Crisis Center of Tampa Bay. A trooper is automatically dispatched if a call is placed, although WWSB found only a few people pick up those phones each year.
"Each person who calls us has somebody in their life who cares about them," Mordecai Dixon, a program manager at the Crisis Center of Tampa Bay, told 10News last year.
If you are struggling, there is help.
You can call the Crisis Center of Tampa Bay by dialing 2-1-1.
You can also call the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-8255.





Sean Michael Davis' film 'Skyway Down'.
.
so much blah, blah, blah...
01.23.15, tampabay.com, funding, technology could prompt suicide barrier

02.13.07, ncbi.nlm.nih.gov, the effect of a bridge safety fence

10.06.03, tampabay.com, skyway safeguards don't deter jumpers

12.25.00, tampabay.com, skyway suicide patrol beefed up

05.05.00, tampabay.com, DOT rules out nets or fences for skyway

09.03.99, a good idea that went nowhere: full article

08.09.66,


02.07.59: full article

"But all the suicides have occurred in the Hillsborough County corridor, and the Hillsborough state attorney's office is getting tired of traveling all the way through Pinellas county to investigate them." (if it keeps an official's ass planted in his/her office, instead of investigating someone's self-death, what better reason to erect a fence?~)
 
the skyway bridge jumper barrier
2020 activity  •  2019  •  2018  •  2017  •  2016  •  2015
2014  •  2013  •  2012  •  2011  •  2010  •  2009
2008  •  2007  •  2006  •  2005  •  2004  •  2003
2002  •  2001  •  2000  •  1999  •  1998  •  1997-1954
report jumper news
jumpers by name
pictures
audiovideos
bridge cameras
research for us
incidents
accidents
skyway disaster
what's new
top of this page
comments
hate mail
infolinks
friends
jumper articles
bridge articles
other bridges
 feel suicidal?
jumper barrier
prevention
site map
home page
about this
disclaimer
ads
contact us
en español add this to your browser favorites. friend  friend us on facebook follow  follow us on twitter